115 bodies pulled of the waters after Egypt boat tragedy

Egyptian coast guard and rescue workers bring ashore bodies recovered from a Europe-bound boat that capsized off Egypt’s Mediterranean coast, in Rosetta, Egypt, Thursday, Sept. 22, 2016. According to the Egyptian health ministry, at least 50 bodies have been recovered so far from the early Wednesday disaster and up to a 100 more migrants remain unaccounted for in what could potentially rank among the deadliest incidents in the migrant route across the Mediterranean. Thousands of illegal migrants have made the dangerous sea voyage in recent years, fleeing war and poverty in the Middle East and elsewhere. (AP Photo/Eman Helal)
Egyptian coast guard and rescue workers bring ashore bodies recovered from a Europe-bound boat that capsized off Egypt’s Mediterranean coast, in Rosetta, Egypt, Thursday, Sept. 22, 2016. According to the Egyptian health ministry, at least 50 bodies have been recovered so far from the early Wednesday disaster and up to a 100 more migrants remain unaccounted for in what could potentially rank among the deadliest incidents in the migrant route across the Mediterranean. Thousands of illegal migrants have made the dangerous sea voyage in recent years, fleeing war and poverty in the Middle East and elsewhere. (AP Photo/Eman Helal)

ROSETTA, Egypt (AP) — A senior Egyptian official says a total of 115 bodies were pulled out of the waters off the Egyptian coast, three days after hundreds of migrants heading to Europe drowned.

Mohammed Sultan, the governor of Beheira province, told The Associated Press that dozens more are feared dead.

The migrants’ boat capsized on Wednesday, nearly 12 kilometers (7.5 miles) from the Nile Delta port city of Rosetta.

The UNHCR estimated that the boat was packed with some 450 people, while the state news agency MENA said earlier that the number might be as high as 600. Some 150 people, mostly Egyptians, survived while many of the dead are women and children who were unable to swim away from the wreckage.

Egypt has been a traditional route for migrants seeking to reach Europe by sea.

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